Startup Spa Chemicals

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spa chemical

What Chemicals Do I Need to Start Up My Spa?

There are things you need to do to get your hot tub or spa ready for you to use and adding chemicals is one of those things. Before you add chemicals, you need to make sure that you test the water first. There are test strips that you can buy specifically for hot tubs and spas, they can tell you about the accurate information for the size of hot tub you are using. There are also liquid test kits that you can buy, or you can take a water sample to a local hot tub store to have them test your water. You want to get a first reading so that you can add the proper amount of chemicals.

You need to get a list of the chemicals that you can use for your hot tub so that you can get the right ones ready to go. There are lists of hot tub startup chemicals that you can find if you do a little research. They can help you not only find the right chemicals, but they can also tell you what order to add them. The right chemicals can make all the difference in the world for your hot tub.

There is a list of the chemicals that you need to start up your hot tub below. This list will also tell you a little about the chemicals that you are using.

  1. Hot Tub Sanitizer

There are a few types of sanitizers that you can use to sanitize your spa, and these include chlorine, bromine, biguanide, minerals, or a saltwater system. Chlorine is the most common of all these because it is cost effective and easy to manage. It also will kill off algae and bacteria aggressively, but it also has a downside. The downside of chlorine is that it has a smell that is sometimes uncomfortable when you are smelling it.

Chlorine puts off chloramines when they are added to the water. You will get a strong smell if chlorine when it reacts to the water and when the chlorine levels in the water are too low.

  1. Hot Tub Shock

Hot tub shock is a chemical that will help give a good boost of hot tub sanitizer. This shock can be chlorine shock or non-chlorine shock to help clear your hot tub of algae blooms or cloudy water. If you use a non-chlorine shock for your chlorine or bromine hot tub, you will be able to use your hot tub sooner than if you used a chlorine shock. If you use a chlorine shock, it will take longer to get into the spa, but it will kill off the algae and bacteria better.

For a mineral hot tub, it is best to use a non-chlorine spa shock, keeping your chlorine levels low. For saltwater tubs, it is best to use chlorine shock so that you can get all the algae and bacteria out, but it is okay to use non-chlorine shock, as well.

  1. Alkalinity Increaser, pH Decreaser, and pH Increaser

These chemicals are often the most confusing of all the chemicals that you must use. pH is used to measure how acidic the water is, while alkalinity acts as a buffer to your pH. These two work together and can affect each other with their changes. Your alkalinity level should be around one hundred to one hundred fifty ppm. The best pH level should be around 7.4 to 7.6 because a low pH level can your spa to corrode, while a high pH can lead to burning eyes and dry, itchy skin.

Clean pools

  1. Calcium Hardness Increaser

You might not like hard water when it comes to your household water, but you need it for your hot tub. If your spa water is too soft, it can ruin your plumbing and the hot tub shell. You need to have a calcium hardness increaser at around one hundred seventy-five and two hundred fifty ppm. If the calcium hardness gets too high, you will have to empty the spa and clean it thoroughly. Then you can start over again with fresh, clean water.

  1. Line Flush Cleaner

After about three or four months your hot tub plumbing can be filled with dirt, mineral deposits, and grime. You will need to use the line flush cleaner every three or four months, empty and then refill your hot tub. You can learn more about line flush cleaner and why it is important here: https://www.wikihow.com/Clean-a-Hot-Tub. This site will give you more information about this type of cleaner.

These are just a few of the chemicals that you need to get started setting up your spa. There are more chemicals that are options that you can use, but you do not have to.

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